Scroll down this page to learn about: Balsam Peru, Basil, Bay, Benzoin, Bergamot, Birch, Black Pepper and Borage Seed.

Balsam Peru

BALSAM PERU ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Balsam  Peru essential oil originates from Peru and is extracted from the scorched tree stems, the bark cut in V-shaped incisions made in the trunk and a vessel is secured under the incision to collect the resin which is then purified by melting, straining and solidifying.
 

Botanical Name: Myroxylon pereira

This oil is used as a fixative and base note in soaps and body care  products, and is sometimes found in commercial soft drinks.
 

Method of Extraction: Steam distilled
 

Parts Used: Resin
 

Country of Origin: South America

Cultivation Method: Wildcrafted

Blends Well With: Patchouli, Petitgrain, Rose, Sandalwood, Ylang Ylang, Spices, Floral & Oriental Bases.
 

Scent: Balsamic, vanilla-type, warm, & smoky
 

Contraindications:  Skin sensitivity in some individuals, non toxic, non-irritant.
 

About the Oil
Balsam Peru is clear yellow to yellow brown liquid. It has a vanilla like scent. For this reason you will see it as a scenting agent in creams and lotions.
 

Aromatherapy Notes
Balsam Peru is a wonderful addition to blends formulated for skin irritations, because it may promote the growth of epithelial cells.  


Traditional Uses

It has been used to ease rheumatic pain and help with irritated skin conditions.  It is also useful for respiratory complaints.


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, cicatrix, expectorant, stimulant


Safety

Generally considered safe.
 

Basil

BASIL ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

This  is a lovely, rich, Sweet Basil organically grown and distilled from    Egypt. Basil essential oil has a wide array of applications from sharpening the mental state to relieving fatigue. Its complex aroma has slightly green and balsamic undertones, and this linalool chemotype in particular is found to be sweeter, and considered the safest, of all Basil varieties.
 

Botanical Name: Ocimum basilicum

This pure essential oil is steam distilled from the whole flowering herb of linalool chemotype Basil, organically grown in Egypt.


Method of Extraction: Steam distilled

Parts Used: Leaves/flowers

Country of Origin: France, Madagascar, or USA

Cultivation Method: Wildcrafted


Blends Well With:  Bergamot, Black Pepper, Cedar Atlas, Chamomile-Roman, Eucalyptus-Lemon, Clary Sage, Coriander Seed, Cypress, Eucalyptus-Radiata, Fennel-Sweet,  Geranium , Ginger, Grapefruit, Hyssop, Juniper Berry, Lavender, Lemon,  Lime, Sweet Marjoram, Niaouli, Oakmoss Absolute, Frankincense, Orange,  Oregano, Palmarosa, Pine, Rosemary, Sage, Tea Tree, and Thyme.
 

Scent: Warm, spicy, and herbal with a hot, somewhat anise tasting "bite"
 

Contraindications:  Possible sensitivity in some individuals, avoid during pregnancy

About the Oil
This pure essential oil is steam distilled from the whole flowering herb of linalool chemotype Basil, organically grown in Egypt.


Aromatherapy Notes
A sweetly-spiced, grassy and fresh top note on a distinctly round,  full   bodied balsamic and wood undertone generate uplifting, awakening, clarifying and stimulating effects.

Sweeter than the methyl chavicol type, this Basil oil is  an excellent choice for a wide array of aromatherapy applications. It  blends and balances nicely with Bergamot,   Peppermint and Eucalyptus  oils.


Traditional Uses

Basil essential oil has been referred to as 'the royal oil to  strengthen   the mind and heart and to reinforce resistance against  infectious diseases.' Traditionally used to treat a wide array of problems such as   anxiety, insect bites, nausea, muscular aches, flu,  fever, pulmonary   infections and infectious diseases. During the 16th  century, powdered   leaves of Basil were also inhaled to treat migraines  and chest infections. A reputed aphrodisiac, women in Italy during  the same time period often wore the herb to attract suitors.


It is commonly used in Ayurveda to sharpen the mind, enhance  memory and to treat respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, coughs  and chest colds.


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Antidepressant, Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Carminative, Digestive, Expectorant


Safety

The linalool chemotype is considered the safest of all  Basil   varieties. Over and improper use of Basil should be avoided as  it can over-stimulate the nervous system. Always test a small amount of essential oil first for sensitivity or allergic reaction. Not to be used during pregnancy but otherwise it is normally a non-toxic,  non-irritant with possible sensitivity in some individuals. 

Bay

BAY LAUREL ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

100%  pure essential oil of Bay Laurel leaf, from trees organically grown on the Mediterranean island of Crete. Bay Laurel oil is unique in aromatherapy with a broad spectrum of effects from its diverse molecular components. Research has shown it to be a potent anti-viral. It is  the Mediterranean varieties that are preferred in aromatherapy use.
 

Botanical Name: Laurus nobilis
 

Bay laurel is also known as 'bay sweet' and 'Mediterranean bay'. Bay Laurel is an evergreen tree that grows up to 20 meters in height. It is native to the Mediterranean region and became a symbol of victory  and honor to the Roman Empire, where wreaths of Bay Laurel leaves were placed on the heads of University graduates (called 'bachelors' from  the   Latin 'baccalaureus' or 'laurel berry').


Method of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Leaf/branch/berries
Country of Origin: Spain or Hungary

Cultivation Method:Wildcrafted


Blends Well With:  Bergamot, Cedar Atlas, Eucalyptus-Radiata, Fennel-Sweet, Ginger,  Orange, Patchouli, Rosemary, Ylang Ylang, Pine, Cypress, Juniper Berry,  Lavender, Frankincense, Clary Sage, Cistus / Labdanum, Citrus &  Spice Oils.
 

Scent: Spicy, somewhat camphoraceous, herbaceous, and warm odor with a "bite"
 

About the Oil
Bay Laurel or Laurel Leaf essential oil is well regarded in  aromatherapy   due to its unique molecular structure. It contains  elements of nearly   all of the primary chemical groups that make up  essential oils. The result is a broad range of therapeutic uses.


This oil is steam distilled from the leaves of organically cultivated Bay Laurel trees grown on the island of Crete.


Aromatherapy Notes
A herbaceous top note that is reminiscent of mint and sage melds  with a deeply-spiced nutmeg-clove middle note to deliver a powerfully spicy medicinal aroma.


This Bay Laurel oil will blend well with others in   the same  family such as Eucalyptus, Rosemary and Clary sage as well as Pine, Juniper, Rosemary, Olibadnum, Lavender, most citrus and spice oils.


Traditional Uses

Bay Laurel has primarily been used to alleviate digestive complaints.
 

Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Antibacterial, Antiviral, Antirheumetic, Antiseptic, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Emmenagogue, Fungicidal, Hypotensive, Sedative, Stomachic.


Safety

When used in correct proportion, bay laurel essential oil is  non-toxic and a non-irritant, however individuals with skin sensitivities should use sparingly. Should not be used during  pregnancy.
 

Benzoin

BENZOIN ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Benzoin oil is extracted from resin of the Styrax Benzoin tree and belongs  to  the Stryracaceae family. It is also known as gum benzoin, luban jawi (meaning frankincense of Java), Benjamin or Styrax benzoin.
 

Botanical Name: Styrax benzoin
 

This resinous oil has a great calming and  uplifting effect on the  mind and helps to comfort the sad and lonely, while boosting circulation and easing respiratory disorders. At the same time it boosts the skin's elasticity, while calming redness,  itchiness and irritation.
 

Method of Extraction: Solvent extraction
Parts Used: Resin
Country of Origin: Laos

Cultivation Method: Wildcrafted


Blends Well With: Sandalwood, Rose, Jasmine, Balsam, Frankincense, Myrrh, Cypress,   Juniper Berry, Lemon, Coriander Seed & Other Citrus & Spice Oils.
 

Scent: Sweet, warm and vanilla-like
 

Contraindications: Non toxic, non-irritant, possible sensitization of skin in some individuals.
 

About the Oil
Thick brown, viscous liquid.
 

Aromatherapy Notes
The main constituent of Benzoin Essential  Oil is benzoic acid, which has properties that are antiseptic, anti-depressant, anti-inflammatory,  carminative, deodorant, diuretic and expectorant.  The sweet resin is widely used as a fixative in perfumes but has also  been used medicinally for respiratory ailments,  and skin conditions such as acne, eczema and psoriasis.


Traditional Uses

Also known as Gum Benjamin, Benzoin is one of the classic ingredients of incense, and in ancient times it was used as a fumigator. It is the primary ingredient in Friar's Balsam, and was medicinally used to  paint   sore throats and mouth ulcers. In cosmetic use, it was the additive to rosewater for the centuries-old facial cleanser and toner  known as Virgin's Milk, and the ladies of the Royal House of Windsor attributed their beautiful complexions to the use of  Friar's Balsam  in freshly made barley water. 


Therapeutic Properties 

Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Antiseptic,  anti-depressant, astringent, anti-inflammatory,  carminative, cordial, deodorant, diuretic, expectorant, sedative and vulnerary.


Safety

Benzoin  is a non-toxic and non-irritant, but a mild sensitizer and should be avoided if you have sensitive or allergy-prone skin. 

Bergamot

BERGAMOT ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Our pure Bergamot oil comes from bitter oranges cold pressed from the peels of ripe organically fruit grown in Italy.
 

Italy is known for the finest soils for the production of exceptional citrus fruit.
 

This is a wonderful 100% pure Bergamot essential oil with a beautiful, full bouquet.
This is by far the most complex Bergamot we've ever experienced.
 

Botanical Name: Citrus bergamia

Bergamot  is pressed from the fruit of a tree which actually offers 3 common  varieties of essential oils: Bergamot - the oil pressed from the rind of  the tree's fruit, Neroli - steam distilled from the flowers which will  eventually become the fruit, Petitgrain (French for 'small grains') from  leaves and branches with unripe fruit (the 'petit' grains), plus a  fourth oil now becoming popular being 'Neroli Petitgrain', a steam  distilled oil from the leaves and branches of the tree when the branches  are in full bloom.
 

Citrus bergamia, also called Citrus aurant bergamia is native to the  Mediterranean, growing up to 12 meters in height when uncultivated;  Bergamot's origin a small coastal area of southern Calabria in Italy,  where the trees grow to their fullest. It is thought that the soil of  the region produces some of the very finest citrus fruit in all the  world. The tree has smooth oval leaves and produces small  greenish-yellow fruit that is very bitter. Because of the bitterness, it  is normally not eaten, though the oil pressed from the peels has become  a popular aromatic throughout the ages.  


Bergamot essential oil was in one of the first 'eau de cologne'  formulas, and continues to this day to be found in a number of 'high  end' perfumes and colognes. The essential oil is also notably found in  Earl Grey Tea, a black tea lightly flavored by Bergamot.


Aromatherapy Notes

Bergamot can have a range of aroma's and aromatic intensities.  There are some that are produced from fruit that are not picked quite at  the right time, or perhaps have not had ideal rains and temperatures  for the season, resulting in an aroma that may seem week or 'incomplete' when sampled. The finer the essential oil, the more complex its aroma  will be, with the very best notably being both sweet and tart at the  same time. We have found this to be the case with this particular  organic variety - while we have sampled oils which are a little sweeter,  and some being a little more sour, there have been no others so well  rounded as this one.


Quite a bit of research has been performed using Bergamot essential  oil. It has been recommended as a 'complementary therapy' due to its  ability to reduce the need for pain medication where users are both  inhaling the aroma regularly, and are on medication for pain reduction  of some kind co-currently. Bergamot is thought to be the most effective  'anti-depressant' aromatic in aromatherapy today. It seems to give a  lift when needed (perhaps toward the end of a long day's work), as well  as be relaxing in times of stress. In one study, adolescents wearing  aromatherapy amulets self-scored their psycho-emotional conditions  significantly higher than those who had amulets containing other  substances.


Traditional Uses

Bergamot essential oil has been used in Italy for centuries as a  treatment for fever (including malaria), and many infections including  those of the mouth, skin, respiratory system and urinary tract.   


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Antibacterial, Antidepressant, Antiseptic (pulmonary and genitourinary),  Antispasmodic, Aphrodisiac, Cictrizant, Deodorant, Febrifuge, Hypnotic,  Laxative, Stimulant, Stomachic, Vermifuge, Vulnerary.

Psychology:

  • Powerful antidepressant (especially when exacerbated by fatigue and frustration).      
  • Restorative and calming to over-active mental states.
  •  Aids in unlocking repressed emotions.
  • Alleviates tension and stress.
  • Lessens the perceived intensity of pain
     

Safety

Bergamot oil is considered non-toxic, yet it does contain  bergaptene, a constituent that can be phototoxic and therefore skin  should not be exposed to excessive amounts of direct sunlight for 72  hours after topical application. Further, Bergamot oil is recommended  for use at low concentrations (3% or less in carrier oil), as it can  irritate the skin. If pregnant or breastfeeding, consultation with a  physician is recommended.
 

Birch

BIRCH (SWEET) ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Essential Oil of Birch is steam distilled from the bark of Adirondack Birch trees. The oil, while chemically similar to  Wintergreen, is definitely a specialty oil. It is much more difficult to extract than wintergreen.
 

Botanical Name: Betula lenta
Birch Sweet is credited with being an analgesic, antiflammatory, antipryetic, antirheumatic, antiseptic, astringent, depurative, diuretic, rubefacient, tonic. An effective addition to a massage oil for  sore muscles, sprains and painful joints because of its' anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic properties.
 

Method of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Bark
Country of Origin: Russia

Cultivation Method: Wildcrafted


Blends Well With: Cedarwood, fir balsam, copaiba balsam, sandalwood, peru balsam, spruce, pomouwood, rosewood.
 

Scent: Sweet, sharp, minty scent that is very fresh and similar to Wintergreen
 

Contraindications: Birch Sweet Oil is potentially toxic and may cause skin irritation. Use in dilution and avoid during pregnancy.
 

About the Oil
An effective addition to a massage oil for sore muscles, sprains and painful joints because of its' anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic properties.
 

Aromatherapy Notes
Along with its analgesic effects, Birch also has anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic, antitussive, astringent, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, galactagogue and stimulant properties.


Birch is often included in formulas to open the breathing passages;  deep inhalation of its bright aroma can clear the sinuses and stimulate the mind. Birch blends nicely with Ravensara and/or Eucalyptus for this effect.


Traditional Uses 

Bark was historically used by North American native people as a tonic and beverage to bring on a sweat and to induce "heating".


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Because of the   potentially toxic effects, Birch essential oil  should be used cautiously   and in dilution. This is an oil to know well  before using. However when   used wisely it is an effective addition to  a massage oil for sore   muscles, sprains and painful joints because of  its' anti-inflammatory  and antispasmodic properties. 2 to 3 drops  mixed well into a warm bath can be very soothing. Often used as an  ingredient in skin care products both for problem skin conditions and  as a skin softener.


Safety

Avoid in cases of liver problems. Potentially toxic, it contains methyl salicylate, (the active ingredient in aspirin). 


Not to be used  for anyone on blood   thinning medications, the elderly or fragile. Not  for use when pregnant   or nursing. Possible skin irritant - dilute  well. Avoid contact with any open wounds or mucous membranes. Its' sweet smell suggests candy, keep it well away from children. 

Black Pepper

BLACK PEPPER ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Black Pepper essential oil is CO2 distilled from ripe pepper fruit grown in India. The essential oil benefits significantly from the cold distillation process, retaining more of its lovely spicy nature. May act to increase cellular oxygenation, can support digestion, stimulate  the   endocrine system, increase energy overall, may help with  rheumatoid arthritis symptoms by increasing circulation.
 

Botanical Name: Piper nigrum
The Pepper plant is a perennial, woody vine with heart shaped leaves and small white flowers. Native to south west India, pepper is cultivated primarily in tropical climates such as Indonesia, Malaysia and   Madagascar.
 

Method of Extraction: Steam distilled
Parts Used: Dried, crushed peppercorns
Country of Origin: Madagascar

Cultivation Method: Certified Organic


Blends Well With: Frankincense, Sandalwood, Lavender, Rosemary, Sweet Marjoram, Spice & Floral Oils.
 

Scent: Fresh, woody, warm and spicy aroma with a backnote of fruit
 

Contraindications: Non-toxic, non-sensitizing, irritant in high concentration due to rubefaciant properties.  Use in moderation only.
 

About the Oil
This essential oil is distilled (using low temperatures and carbon dioxide) from dried, unripe fruit of pepper plants naturally grown in  India.
 

Aromatherapy Notes 

Our Black Pepper oil is a deep yellow color and has a soft floral top note followed by a delicate lingering spice with a hint of musky earthiness.


Traditional Uses

Black pepper has been used since antiquity in the culinary and healing arts.

As a stimulant, Indian monks were prescribed seven to nine  peppercorns a   day to increase their endurance while journeying on  foot.


In Chinese medicine, it is used to treat malaria, cholera, dysentery, diarrhea and other digestive problems while in Greece it is used for fever and to support the stomach.


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Analgesic, Antibacterial, Antimicrobial, Antispasmodic, Antitoxic, Aphrodesiac, Carminitive, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Laxative, Rubefacient, Stimulant, Stomachic.


Safety

Generally Black Pepper oil is non-toxic and and non-sensitizing, yet in high concentrations it can irritate skin. As with all essential oils, use only in moderation. 

Borage Seed

BORAGE SEED ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview


Organic cold pressed Borage Seed Oil is a very therapeutic, healing oil for  skin care, as well as joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis.  There is a great body of research on Borage Seed Oil, as it is one of  the highest   known sources of GLA, an essential fat who's deficiency  is associated with inflammatory conditions of the skin and throughout  the body. The research is highly positive, and we recommend including Borage oil in many types of formulas.
 

Botanical Name: Borago officinalis

Borage Seed Oil is a prized oil in skin care for its noteworthy essential fatty acid content, consisting primarily of the omega-6 EFA gamma linolenic acid. Borage Seed Oil has been used in aromatherapy and  natural skin care to aid many skin conditions including eczema.


Method of Extraction: Cold pressed/unrefined

Parts Used: Seed

Country of Origin: France

Cultivation Method: Certified Organic

Scent:  Light and sweet


About the Oil
This particular oil should be kept refrigerated and away from natural and artificial lighting.
 

Aromatherapy Notes
Borage Seed Oil has been used in aromatherapy a natural skin care to aid many skin conditions including eczema.  
 

Borage Seed Oil is expensive and is usually blended in a small (often 10%) dilution with other carrier oils. By their nature, essential fatty acids deteriorate quickly. Borage Seed  Oil, therefore, goes rancid rather quickly.
 

Traditional Uses
It has been widely studied for its ability to calm and reduce inflammation, and has been used successfully to alleviate the pain, swelling, and joint stiffness associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Borage Seed Oil has also been used with positive results for many different skin disorders, such as psoriasis, eczema, acne, rosacea, and prematurely matured skin.  


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Calm, reduce inflammation, pain, swelling, skin disorders, psoriasis, eczema, acne, rosacea, premature aging skin, menstrual cycle, breast inflammation, cramping, menopausal symptoms, hot flashes,  Osteoporosis, calcium deposits and absorption, bone strength and  growth, weight loss, metabolism regulation, dry-eye conditions and pressure in the eyes, Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ulcers, lupus.


Safety

Borage Seed Oil should be avoided during pregnancy, as potential risks are unknown at this time.