Scroll down this page to learn about: Amber, Angelica and Anise.

Amber

AMBER ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Amber  is not an essential oil per se, as it is an almost solid mass of tree resin, but when blended with a little sunflower oil, Frankincense, agarwood, and a few other exotic oils really enhance the true Amber in  the oil itself.
 

Botanical Name: Pinus succinifera

Amber oil is an extract of one or more tree resins, generally found  in a solid or semi-solid form. There is no one tree that produces  amber resin, so there is a great variety of products sold as 'Amber  Oil' that vary greatly in aroma and quality. This amber is very  earthy, without a hint of harshness that may sometimes accompany tree-oils.
 

Scent: Earthy, rich, woody tones. It is mildly sweet and velvety smooth.
 

About the Oil
The first and original amber was developed from ambergris, a waxy substance found floating on the ocean or washed up on the shore.  It was refined into a oil with a strong, yet pleasant aroma. In  ancient   times no one knew the source of this mysterious substance, and  so it   became mythic and highly valued. Later, it was determined that ambergris (meaning gray amber) came from the sperm whale. It is believed that the sperm whale regurgitates the ambergris after eating squid or cuttlefish because the squid bones irritates the stomach lining of the whale. The ambergris is therefore produced as a counter-irritant.


Amber continues to be a highly sought-after fragrance, with its  subtle,   euphoric, warm and exotic aroma. Today, amber does not come  from ambergris as it once did, and, contrary to popular belief,  there is no true amber   essential oil. Amber oil is an extract of one  or more tree resins and   generally found in a solid or semi-solid form.  There is no one species   of tree that produces amber resin, so there  are a great variety of   products sold as 'Amber Oil' that vary greatly  in aroma and quality.
 

Aromatherapy Notes
 

Amber  by itself is a semi solid mass of tree resins and gums with much of the base material coming from the Liquidamber orientalis  tree.        


To get the finished product commonly referred to as 'Amber  oil',   it is prepared in a base of beeswax and is combined with other  essential   oils and carriers.       Studies have shown that properly  prepared   Amber has psychological actions which alter brain waves,  and  thought to   increase heart energy and enhance sensual pleasure.


Traditional Uses 

The first and original amber was from ambergris, a  waxy substance  that   was found floating on the ocean or washed up on the shore in  ancient   times. It can be refined into a oil with a strong, but  pleasant aroma.   In ancient times, no one knew the source of this  mysterious substance, and yet it was highly valued.


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Amber's grounding aroma is nice for meditation or yoga practice.  Its woody, smooth aroma blends nicely with many other oils. The aroma is very pleasant and long lasting.


Safety

Non-toxic, a non-irritant and non-sensitizing.

Angelica

ANGELICA ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Angelica  is a dense, warming essential oil  grounded by cedar and rich earth  undertones. It may help release negative feelings from traumatic events; it is emotionally calming and boosts the immune system to prevent pending sickness.
 

Botanical Name: Angelica archangelica

There are over 30 different types of Angelica, but Angelica archangelica  is the most common species used for medicinal purposes. A native    species to Europe and Siberia, Angelica grows up to 6 feet tall, is covered with a soft 'fur' and produces umbles of white flowers. Early    Europeans noticed the potency of it's healing abilities and rendered it of divine origin, thus naming it: 'holy spirit root' or 'oil of angels'.  


Method of Extraction: Steam distilled
 

Parts Used: Root
 

Country of Origin: France

Cultivation Method: Wildcrafted

Blends Well With: Citrus Oils, Clary Sage, Oakmoss Absolute, Frankincense, Patchouli, and Vetivert.
 

Scent: Sharp, biting odor of green stems, just broken, with peppery overtones
 

Contraindications: Do not use during pregnancy or  if you are diabetic.  Do not use on skin   before sun exposure.  Skin  sensitivity on some individuals.
 

About the Oil
This oil is extracted from the roots of Angelica plants organically grown in Poland. It takes approximately 340 pounds of plant material to produce one pound of Angelica essential oil.


Aromatherapy Notes
The medicinal potency and aromatic qualities are significantly  increased   from the cold processing CO2 distillation process.This  Angelica has top   notes of citrus peel that meld with caramel;  light-scented musk and   floral middle notes are grounded by cedar and  rich earth undertones.It   blends well with: Pacthouli, Opopanax,  Costus, Clary Sage, Oakmoss, Vetiver and all Citrus oils.


Traditional Uses

Stems of the plant were chewed during the plague of 1660 to prevent infection; when burned, the seeds and roots were thought to purify the air.
 

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) uses at least 10 types of Angelica for promoting fertility, fortifying spirit and for treating    female reproductive disorders; Angelica's reputation for support is second only to Ginseng.


Angelica also has a long history of use in   supporting respiratory  conditions such as colds, coughs, and sinus problems; Missourian  tribes smoked it for this purpose. The Alaskan Aleut peoples boiled  the roots for application to both internal and   external wounds in order to speed the healing process.


Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Antispasmodic, Carminative, Depurative, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Emmenagogue, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Nervine, Stimulant, Stomachic.


Safety

Angelica essential oil is non-toxic and non-irritating, though  should   not be used during pregnancy or by diabetics. The oil can be  photo-toxic, and should not be applied to skin that will be exposed to  direct sunlight. 

Anise

ANISE SEED ESSENTIAL OIL


Quick Overview

Anise  Seed essential oil supports digestive complaints, upper respiratory  conditions and menstrual pain. The spicy, licorice-like aroma is warming and uplifting.
 

Botanical Name: Pimpinella anisum
 

Also known as 'Sweet Cumin', Aniseed is a small, delicate annual herb native to Greece and Egypt.
 

Anise seeds are reddish-brow, ovoid in shape and have a distinctly black licorice-like flavor and aroma profile.


Method of Extraction: Steam distilled
 

Parts Used: Seed
 

Country of Origin: Egypt

Cultivation Method: Wildcrafted

Blends Well With: Bay Laurel, Black Pepper, Ginger, Lavender, Orange, Pine, Black Spruce, Fir, Rose.
 

Scent: Warm, sweet, licorice aroma, like Italian Christmas cookies
 

About the Oil 

This pure anise seed essential oil is steam distilled from the seeds  of   dried ripe fruit of Anise grown in its native Egypt. An annual  herb,   Aniseed stands less than a meter high with delicate leaves and  small   white flowers. Although originating in Egypt and Greece, it is now cultivated in India, China, Mexico and Spain for varying purposes.
 

Aromatherapy Notes
A clean, sweetly-spiced top note mingles with a strong black  licorice   middle note to create an uplifting, energizing, mildly  euphoric and  sensually enhancing effect.  


Traditional Uses

Ancient Egyptians cultivated anise as a medicinal and culinary spice and it was later adopted by the Greeks and Romans. Trans-anethole  is the natural constituent that provides the licorice-like aroma that is similar to, yet sweeter than that of Fennel. The oil has traditionally been used to add flavor to various culinary ventures from candy and baked goods to curry dishes. Anise also earned the moniker "the fisherman's friend" when it was added to soaps to aid fisherman in removing the smell on their skin.
 

Therapeutic Properties Described In The Aromatherapy Literature

Antiseptic (mild), Antispasmodic, Carminative, Expectorant, Galactagogue, Stimulant, Stomachic.


Safety

Anise essential oil is considered non-toxic, a non-irritant and    non-sensitizing. Always test a small amount of Anise seed oil first for sensitivity or allergic reaction.